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Thread: This is how we roll

  1. #11
    Quest Builder Anarchy_Balsac's Avatar
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    You know @Gleeok , I think we have a member who can school us both on the coding front.

  2. #12
    Gel
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    @Anarchy_Balsac I don't know about that. I'm pretty good, but I'm literally wasting my 20s on my computer. I'm only really knowledgeable in C and C++.
    My notable skills are: networking, multiplayer, reverse engineering, and game design. I'm especially good at game design. I'm not really the best at coding in general.
    I only know C, C++, Java, PHP, JS, HTML (which is a markup language), and x86 ASM. I'm much more of a low-level C guy though.
    I'm not really that good at JS, I prefer to use emscripten to convert my C/C++ games to HTML5+JS.
    I hate Java, and only learned it so I can write Android apps that use the API properly (the NDK still requires glue code).

    I have to admit I also love x86 assembler. It's pretty beautiful once you get into it.
    I think learning assembler was easier for me because of my EE background. Or it's just because I'm weird. 0.o

    Learning x86 is the single most beneficial skill I think I have ever learned.
    Once you understand get past the basics, you can pretty much reverse engineer anything.

  3. #13
    Quest Builder Anarchy_Balsac's Avatar
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    @_Mitch Wasting your life at your computer = being a programmer

    Well, it can feel like that at times anyway. C and C++ are two of the most important programming languages. You can't count C# because it's just C++ with less overloading.

  4. #14
    Developer ZC Developer
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZoriaRPG View Post
    I sense a level of hyper-optimisation here.

    How refined is the cocaine that you use Gleeok, and where might I acquire some?
    It's not that it's supposed to be a drop-in replacement that's hyper optimized or anything, but more of just something that's lightweight and not stupid in general.


    For you I will share the ultimate secret. You can get the good stuff at any quicky-mart:





    Quote Originally Posted by _Mitch View Post
    I'm a bit late to the party.

    Hash tables are usually nothing fancy, but yours is pretty dang nice, I admit. I remember when I first heard of a hash table, I thought 'why didn't I think of that'- They're a pretty cool idea.
    I've seen some pretty impressive speed improvements by using a hash table. I admit, I also never liked STL, and often the word bloated to describe it; guess I'm part of the minority too!

    Although, I'm probably a little crazier, because I like writing everything from scratch (reinvent the wheel much).
    I'm going to try to make my own game console sometime in a few months, and I'll implement everything from it's blitting onto the screen, to controller input.
    There will definitely be no STL there! It's probably pretty redundant, but once it's done, cloning it would likely be easy. Maybe I'll give them as gifts.


    I found this line particularly hurtful.

    I was never a fan of C# >.> So I'd probably create some sort of external C-like bytecode compiler, and bytecode interpreter.
    Again I reinvent the wheel so much I cry myself to sleep at night. I have a problem, and it affects my rate of completion. 0.o
    If you can turn a cheap last-gen smartphone into a full-blown OUYA-like console with a controller that outputs to a TV and will run emulators like SNES, PSX, etc you will be a god amongst nerds.

    I'm not really a fan of lua or dynamically-typed languages, and I wasn't really digging the angelscript for all the stuff I needed to do... so c# scripting at that point was a no brainer, really. The downside is that it is very time-consuming to bind everything properly--especially when you want quick proxy or place-holders for thing that aren't done yet.
    This post contains the official Gleeok™ seal of approval. Look for these and other posts in an area near you.

  5. #15
    Gel
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    If you can turn a cheap last-gen smartphone into a full-blown OUYA-like console with a controller that outputs to a TV and will run emulators like SNES, PSX, etc you will be a god amongst nerds.

    I'm not really a fan of lua or dynamically-typed languages, and I wasn't really digging the angelscript for all the stuff I needed to do... so c# scripting at that point was a no brainer, really. The downside is that it is very time-consuming to bind everything properly--especially when you want quick proxy or place-holders for thing that aren't done yet.
    My console will not have Android OS though, that's for sure. I imagine it being OS-less, like the FAMICOM/NES! :]
    I hear ya. I'm not a fan of lua or angelscript either (just because of the syntax alone)!
    To be honest, I really hate dynamically typed languages! It just loses flexibility that way (and often performance).

    C# isn't too bad, it's just I'm OCD about memory usage and stuff (probably because of my uC programming experience).
    Complexity and flexibility usually come at the expense of speed (think c# scripting), unfortunately.
    Sometimes you just have to juggle the value of a rolling it yourself and development time.

    Also, the Ouya is a little disappointing, it's lower end than most phones, runs the same stuff, isn't portable.
    At least Ouya gets a controller (even though most android apps are designed for touch screens).

  6. #16
    Mad, Mad, Author ZoriaRPG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by _Mitch View Post
    My console will not have Android OS though, that's for sure. I imagine it being OS-less, like the FAMICOM/NES! :]
    I hear ya. I'm not a fan of lua or angelscript either (just because of the syntax alone)!
    To be honest, I really hate dynamically typed languages! It just loses flexibility that way (and often performance).

    C# isn't too bad, it's just I'm OCD about memory usage and stuff (probably because of my uC programming experience).
    Complexity and flexibility usually come at the expense of speed (think c# scripting), unfortunately.
    Sometimes you just have to juggle the value of a rolling it yourself and development time.

    Also, the Ouya is a little disappointing, it's lower end than most phones, runs the same stuff, isn't portable.
    At least Ouya gets a controller (even though most android apps are designed for touch screens).
    What implementation do you intend? Something that acts as a minimalistic HAL, with JIT cross-compiling? You'll need some kind of F/R OS though, for it to work. If you're going through all that effort, why not just do your own FPGA implementation, and aim for an ASIC?

    I think you'll find that the sheer number of memory mappers for the NES/FC, and directly implementing them at an assembly level will be a gigantic stumbling block, particularly M90 mMC5, and VRC7.

    I've liked what I've seen of AngelScript, primarily because it allows C, and C++ syntax, including a mixture of both; and it's a ZLIB license. It's still an interpreter though, and there is no real reason that you couldn't allow four different syntaxes to compile to the same engine... The main disadvantage of C# that it's designed for Windows, and I'm shaky on support for PSOX-based OSes, which is why I'd be wary of it, although admittedly, I haven;t enough experience to form an objective opinion...

    Sorry Gleeok, but Posix OS compatibility is always high on my priority list. Besides, you'll never be happy until you write your own interpreter from scratch, and you know it.

    Maybe I should make ZPASCAL or ZCOBOL90, to prove a point. Then I can take an extended leave to a padded resort!


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  7. #17
    Gel
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    What implementation do you intend? Something that acts as a minimalistic HAL, with JIT cross-compiling? You'll need some kind of F/R OS though, for it to work. If you're going through all that effort, why not just do your own FPGA implementation, and aim for an ASIC?

    I think you'll find that the sheer number of memory mappers for the NES/FC, and directly implementing them at an assembly level will be a gigantic stumbling block, particularly M90 mMC5, and VRC7.

    I've liked what I've seen of AngelScript, primarily because it allows C, and C++ syntax, including a mixture of both; and it's a ZLIB license. It's still an interpreter though, and there is no real reason that you couldn't allow four different syntaxes to compile to the same engine... The main disadvantage of C# that it's designed for Windows, and I'm shaky on support for PSOX-based OSes, which is why I'd be wary of it, although admittedly, I haven;t enough experience to form an objective opinion...

    Sorry Gleeok, but Posix OS compatibility is always high on my priority list. Besides, you'll never be happy until you write your own interpreter from scratch, and you know it.

    Maybe I should make ZPASCAL or ZCOBOL90, to prove a point. Then I can take an extended leave to a padded resort!
    I'm steering clear of FPGA for now. But I do intend on using it at some point; it's not a simple topic, and something I'd like a little practice with first (I have no real experience with hardware descriptive languages in the first place). My console won't be designed like the NES exactly, just similar in usage. I've never done anything with JIT compilation, have you (I'd like some tips)? JIT-compilation can be interesting but machine level compilers tend to be insanely complex, plus if I wrote my own I doubt I'd get decent performance out of it (except in a multiprocessor environment).

    It'll be very simple in design, and use stuff I have in my junk drawer. I will be using an ATmega32 as a cheap video display controller (crazy, but it works), and a ARM cortex M3 (underpowered, but it's retro) for processing everything. I'm going to use NES controllers (just because I have a few). An SD card will store all the games in raw Intel HEX format, in individual directories (with graphics); on boot you choose one to play. Once a game is chosen, it'll re-program the micro with the game; It's basic, won't have a lot of memory, and no background processes running (just the game).

    I admit I have been thinking about an FPGA like custom GPU- but I'll save that for another time; I'm sure it'll take a few months till I get anywhere. There won't be any removable cartridges, or (E)EPROM chips. I worked on an NES emulator once, pretty painful to be honest. I'm also hoping to make something easier to develop (6502 isn't my definition of easy, decimal support or not).

    If I add any scripting to any game (on the console or not) I usually implement it with an external program that you write in, and compiles it into a bytecode. The interpreter is usually pretty basic; and (like the bytecode compiler) game/program specific. I prefer to use a switch statement, because of performance reasons (plus function pointers can be a pain to debug). But any scripting would be in a C-like syntax, of course. I would go into detail about past implementations, but that would just be a wall of text here. I've never combined both compiler and interpreter for a write and run environment before (never had to), but for complex stuff that would be helpful. I've never written GP scripting, only stuff embedded into a game (for map making).

    If you design your own interpreter, it'll likely be faster (for the specific task / planned usage) and probably easier for you to write in (especially on memory constrained systems). Originally C# was designed for Windows, but it's just a language, and recently, I have seen Linux and Unix implementations. Similarly I have a thing against C# because of it's Microsoft orientation, and portability issues. I grudge against Microsoft for attempting to overthrow C++ with C#- but what I really hate is .NET and Microsoft's anti C agenda. The only real thing I have against angelscript is I didn't write it TBH .

    BTW I didn't intend to hijack any threads, so I'll try to stop now (it's a bad habit I have). Also, sorry about the wall.
    Last edited by _Mitch; 08-01-2015 at 10:51 PM.

  8. #18
    Mad, Mad, Author ZoriaRPG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by _Mitch View Post
    I'm steering clear of FPGA for now. But I do intend on using it at some point; it's not a simple topic, and something I'd like a little practice with first (I have no real experience with hardware descriptive languages in the first place). My console won't be designed like the NES exactly, just similar in usage. I've never done anything with JIT compilation, have you (I'd like some tips)? JIT-compilation can be interesting but machine level compilers tend to be insanely complex, plus if I wrote my own I doubt I'd get decent performance out of it (except in a multiprocessor environment).

    It'll be very simple in design, and use stuff I have in my junk drawer. I will be using an ATmega32 as a cheap video display controller (crazy, but it works), and a ARM cortex M3 (underpowered, but it's retro) for processing everything. I'm going to use NES controllers (just because I have a few). An SD card will store all the games in raw Intel HEX format, in individual directories (with graphics); on boot you choose one to play. Once a game is chosen, it'll re-program the micro with the game; It's basic, won't have a lot of memory, and no background processes running (just the game).

    I admit I have been thinking about an FPGA like custom GPU- but I'll save that for another time; I'm sure it'll take a few months till I get anywhere. There won't be any removable cartridges, or (E)EPROM chips. I worked on an NES emulator once, pretty painful to be honest. I'm also hoping to make something easier to develop (6502 isn't my definition of easy, decimal support or not).

    If I add any scripting to any game (on the console or not) I usually implement it with an external program that you write in, and compiles it into a bytecode. The interpreter is usually pretty basic; and (like the bytecode compiler) game/program specific. I prefer to use a switch statement, because of performance reasons (plus function pointers can be a pain to debug). But any scripting would be in a C-like syntax, of course. I would go into detail about past implementations, but that would just be a wall of text here. I've never combined both compiler and interpreter for a write and run environment before (never had to), but for complex stuff that would be helpful. I've never written GP scripting, only stuff embedded into a game (for map making).

    If you design your own interpreter, it'll likely be faster (for the specific task / planned usage) and probably easier for you to write in (especially on memory constrained systems). Originally C# was designed for Windows, but it's just a language, and recently, I have seen Linux and Unix implementations. Similarly I have a thing against C# because of it's Microsoft orientation, and portability issues. I grudge against Microsoft for attempting to overthrow C++ with C#- but what I really hate is .NET and Microsoft's anti C agenda. The only real thing I have against angelscript is I didn't write it TBH .

    BTW I didn't intend to hijack any threads, so I'll try to stop now (it's a bad habit I have). Also, sorry about the wall.

    My only tip for the present: Design your USB to SSR bridge PIC to use dual 4021 SSRs as inputs. That will give you SNES/SuFami, and NES/FC controller support, with no sacrifices. I did some basic JIT stuff in the past, but applicability to this project, is rather thin. As to FPGA design, the best thing, is to jump into it head first, and play with it, so that you can acclimate. It's the ultimate fusion of SE and EE, and depends on knowing the logic of both. There are tools to convert schem designs into FPGA instructions, but I can't attest to the best of those, at present.

    If you want to discuss it further, a new topic would probably be best.

    Regarding C#: Taking something that works, that everyone understands, and hijacking it, to make something proprietary, is exactly what Microsoft do as daily business. I'm more shocked that it can be used withotut .NET on Posix OSes. (I never expected that, and anticipated more of a boycott from the OSS community, regarding .NET reliance.)


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  9. #19
    Developer ZC Developer
    Gleeok's Avatar
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    Microsoft .NET and Java mentality are the reasons it takes newer versions of stuff to take 1000 times longer to open. Considering that computers are like magnitudes faster now than they used to be I have pretty much just given up on the entire human race as a species to actually care about things...

    But! On the flip side: I'm using mono, which is cross-platform. Plus, I have to say that c# is a great high-level language; I can't wait until all this other stuff is out of the way and I can just work mostly on scripts for a change. :)


    Also, as a side note: That;s entirely way too many computer-techy acronyms too handle.
    This post contains the official Gleeok™ seal of approval. Look for these and other posts in an area near you.

  10. #20
    Developer ZC Developer
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    Just a little follow up here. I've been cleaning up a lot of unused code (by that I mean ripping out things only used from older projects into a separate library) and sanitizing some things in the process, and this hashtable happened to get caught up in it, so I went ahead and optimized it and ran the benchmark again for fun. :)

    I also removed most of the template code for the new version, to optimize for compile times and code bloat as well. I have a template bloat test that I run (it's basically a code generator from macros) which creates a bunch of instantiations of templates; this beats any std::anything compile times by a ridiculous margin, and only generates <1% code bloat by comparison, apparently, so I'm satisfied enough.

    This time I upped the value size to at least try and give chained-hashing a good run, but it's even worse than before...

    *Note*
    HashTable = original version.
    HashTable2 = new version.
    Code:
    [03:33:46]  --- Speed Test. ---
    [03:33:46]  --- Iteration Size = 512. ---
    [03:33:46]  --- HashTable Load Factor: 50 percent. ---
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 0, 0, 0, 0
    [03:33:46] raw array baseline:   3207
    [03:33:46] HashTable     insert: 134018
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    insert: 103645
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  insert: 585884
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map insert: 640239
    [03:33:46] std::map      insert: 529085
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> insert: 967153
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map insert: 185046
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 511, 511, 511, 511
    [03:33:46] HashTable     clear: 43197
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    clear: 6711
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  clear: 230845
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map clear: 275579
    [03:33:46] std::map      clear: 480117
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> clear: 19228
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map clear: 84533
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 0, 0, 0, 0
    [03:33:46] HashTable     insert: 268658
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    insert: 278309
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  insert: 487562
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map insert: 795025
    [03:33:46] std::map      insert: 938527
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> insert: 1060380
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map insert: 241995
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 511, 511, 511, 511
    [03:33:46] HashTable     find: 62056
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    find: 13803
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  find: 87671
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map find: 75523
    [03:33:46] std::map      find: 147322
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> find: 189381
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map find: 18451
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 511, 511, 511, 511
    [03:33:46] HashTable     remove: 53568
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    remove: 53844
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  remove: 60767
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map remove: 146094
    [03:33:46] std::map      remove: 121547
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> remove: 87439
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map remove: 35045
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 383, 383, 383, 383
    [03:33:46] HashTable     find: 28340
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    find: 5939
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  find: 36020
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map find: 64632
    [03:33:46] std::map      find: 128579
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> find: 144129
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map find: 104023
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  --- Speed Test. ---
    [03:33:46]  --- Iteration Size = 768. ---
    [03:33:46]  --- HashTable Load Factor: 75 percent. ---
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 0, 0, 0, 0
    [03:33:46] raw array baseline:   4816
    [03:33:46] HashTable     insert: 260679
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    insert: 254548
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  insert: 376892
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map insert: 1259679
    [03:33:46] std::map      insert: 892279
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> insert: 1188773
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map insert: 301241
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 767, 767, 767, 767
    [03:33:46] HashTable     clear: 100992
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    clear: 10515
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  clear: 441884
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map clear: 349907
    [03:33:46] std::map      clear: 565421
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> clear: 37769
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map clear: 66423
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 0, 0, 0, 0
    [03:33:46] HashTable     insert: 336994
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    insert: 260514
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  insert: 552926
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map insert: 952609
    [03:33:46] std::map      insert: 1278542
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> insert: 1504508
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map insert: 286960
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 767, 767, 767, 767
    [03:33:46] HashTable     find: 103123
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    find: 19976
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  find: 279149
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map find: 356751
    [03:33:46] std::map      find: 123995
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> find: 432412
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map find: 132491
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 767, 767, 767, 767
    [03:33:46] HashTable     remove: 53389
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    remove: 30244
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  remove: 162388
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map remove: 184580
    [03:33:46] std::map      remove: 175415
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> remove: 168393
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map remove: 17975
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 575, 575, 575, 575
    [03:33:46] HashTable     find: 26669
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    find: 14989
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  find: 55588
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map find: 280343
    [03:33:46] std::map      find: 112630
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> find: 304988
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map find: 129425
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  --- Speed Test. ---
    [03:33:46]  --- Iteration Size = 1024. ---
    [03:33:46]  --- HashTable Load Factor: 100 percent. ---
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 0, 0, 0, 0
    [03:33:46] HashTable     insert: 358430
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    insert: 343127
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  insert: 951636
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map insert: 1230571
    [03:33:46] std::map      insert: 1690042
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> insert: 2068730
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map insert: 456155
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 1023, 1023, 1023, 1023
    [03:33:46] HashTable     find: 156528
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    find: 23810
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  find: 174245
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map find: 227375
    [03:33:46] std::map      find: 353819
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> find: 665612
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map find: 85126
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 1023, 1023, 1023, 1023
    [03:33:46] HashTable     remove: 114643
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    remove: 84462
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  remove: 205326
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map remove: 309403
    [03:33:46] std::map      remove: 248285
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> remove: 430286
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map remove: 64323
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 767, 767, 767, 767
    [03:33:46] HashTable     find: 149344
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    find: 18428
    [03:33:46] ea::hash_map  find: 193752
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map find: 295686
    [03:33:46] std::map      find: 143338
    [03:33:46] std::map<str> find: 171214
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map find: 1065822
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  --- Worst case test ---
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 0, 0, 0, 0
    [03:33:46] HashTable     insert: 242623
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    insert: 266851
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map insert: 651776
    [03:33:46] std::map      insert: 521774
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map insert: 284348
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  --- HashTable Load Factor: 50 percent. ---
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 512, 512, 512, 512
    [03:33:46] HashTable     find: 44821
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    find: 8608
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map find: 268987
    [03:33:46] std::map      find: 134476
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map find: 21596
    [03:33:46] HashTable     remove: 47197
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    remove: 8031
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map remove: 234941
    [03:33:46] std::map      remove: 257659
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map remove: 14391
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  --- HashTable Load Factor: 25 percent. ---
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 256, 256, 256, 256
    [03:33:46] HashTable     find: 41936
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    find: 3722
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map find: 55741
    [03:33:46] std::map      find: 53282
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map find: 38327
    [03:33:46] HashTable     insert: 175521
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    insert: 176591
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map insert: 509196
    [03:33:46] std::map      insert: 435533
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map insert: 256612
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  --- HashTable Load Factor: 67 percent. ---
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 683, 683, 683, 683
    [03:33:46] HashTable     find: 125480
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    find: 20572
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map find: 357002
    [03:33:46] std::map      find: 286201
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map find: 135255
    [03:33:46] HashTable     insert: 4739951
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    insert: 176813
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map insert: 888408
    [03:33:46] std::map      insert: 372748
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map insert: 204137
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  --- HashTable Load Factor: 83 percent. ---
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 848, 848, 848, 848
    [03:33:46] HashTable     find: 408489
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    find: 285519
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map find: 248305
    [03:33:46] std::map      find: 168740
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map find: 131819
    [03:33:46] HashTable     remove: 2152647
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    remove: 701855
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map remove: 194693
    [03:33:46] std::map      remove: 214543
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map remove: 49955
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46]  --- HashTable Load Factor: 63 percent. ---
    [03:33:46]  
    [03:33:46] sizes 647, 647, 647, 647
    [03:33:46] HashTable     find: 144374
    [03:33:46] HashTable2    find: 91816
    [03:33:46] std::hash_map find: 175481
    [03:33:46] std::map      find: 142534
    [03:33:46] rde::hash_map find: 112440
    2nd moral of the story?

    Don't use std:: for anything. It's all shit crap fucking stupid. Just including the single hashmapTest.h file increased my compile time by over 400% making me very sad, so this is definitely the last time I ever randomly benchmark c++ things.

    It sounds like I'm ranting now so I'll call it a day.
    One of these days in the near future I plan to put up a bunch of single file libs on github. Not like anybody will ever use them, but hey, why not.
    This post contains the official Gleeok™ seal of approval. Look for these and other posts in an area near you.

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Armageddon Games is a game development group founded in 1997. We are extremely passionate about our work and our inspirations are mostly drawn from games of the 8-bit and 16-bit era.
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